The India China Institute puts on a series of events every year, ranging from speakers to exhibits to international conferences. Below is a list of our upcoming events. For the full calendar, please click here.

Upcoming Events

Sep
27
Wed
2017
Chat n’ Chai 2017 & Kailas Folk Stories Book Launch @ Klein Conference Room (510), The New School
Sep 27 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Chat n' Chai 2017 & Kailas Folk Stories Book Launch @ Klein Conference Room (510), The New School

Join the India China Institute on Wednesday, September 27th from 5-7:30 pm for our annual Chat n’ Chai event.

Come learn more about the India China Institute and the work we do, and how you can get involved. For students at The New School, find out how you can apply for our $3,000 Student Travel and Research Grant, which supports student research and travel in India or China. Listen to past Student Fellows talk about their experiences this past summer in India and China. We’ll also talk about ways students can get involved with ICI, from taking classes to working as RAs or volunteers.

After the Student Fellows presentations, we will also be introducing two new book publications which ICI has been working on for the past year as part of our Sacred Himalaya Initiative. We will be showcasing two new books of folk stories from the Himalaya region, as well as talking more about our work to compile and make this content, and much more, available through a digital sacred mapping project.

Light refreshment will be served.

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Oct
16
Mon
2017
China India Scholar-Leaders Fellowship Deadline
Oct 16 all-day
China India Scholar-Leaders Fellowship Deadline

 

The deadline for applying to the Second Cohort of our India China Scholar-Leaders Initiative (CISLI) Fellowship is October 16, 2017. Applications and supporting letters must be submitted no later than today to be considered. The CFP for the CISLI Fellowship can be found here.

The Fellowship offers an intensive 24 month professional development experience for junior scholars focused on the theme of Prosperity and Inequality in India and China. Fellows will develop a research project related to their area of expertise and connected to the theme of Prosperity and Inequality. Fellows will also have the opportunity to spend one month in New York City and 5-7 weeks conducting fieldwork on their research topic in India or China. Fellows will be provided research support and methods training, as well as interactions with noted scholars working on Prosperity and Inequality in India and China. Fellows will be expected to produce at least one publishable article, policy paper or scholarly piece by the end of the Fellowship. The Fellowship includes an award of USD $5,000, and covers all travel-related costs, funding support for field research, and all New York residency costs (food, lodging, travel, etc.). The total value of the Fellowship is approximately USD $37,000. The program is structured so that Fellows can largely continue primary teaching or research obligations at their home institutions while also participating in the Fellowship.

More information about the CISLI and current Fellows can be found on the main CISLI page here.

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Oct
18
Wed
2017
Reversing Roles? Environmental Politics and Policy in China and the US in the Trump and Xi Jingping Era w/ Robert Gottlieb @ Orozco Room (712), The New School
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Reversing Roles? Environmental Politics and Policy in China and the US in the Trump and Xi Jingping Era w/ Robert Gottlieb @ Orozco Room (712), The New School

Reversing Roles?

Environmental Politics and Policy in China and the US in the Trump and Xi Jingping Era

A book talk by Professor Robert Gottlieb

October 18, 2017 | 6:00-8:00 pm

Orozco Room (712), 66 W. 12th St

RSVP Now

 

About the Talk

Has there been a role reversal between the US and China on the environment?

China has long been considered an environmental outlier — horrendous smog episodes, water unfit to drink and even to irrigate, huge increases in the number of cars on the road, a global leader in the use of pesticides, a major coal producer and importer, a reluctant participant in global climate negotiations until recently, and more. The US, until November 9, had been seen as at least modestly responsive to environmental concerns. Now with Donald Trump and Scott Pruitt ensconced in Washington seeking to systematically dismantle the environmental policy system in contrast to the passage of environmental legislation and a new role around climate change in China, the roles do seem to be reversing. Is that an accurate view?

The answer is yes and no. The talk will compare current US and China environmental approaches in such areas as air pollution, transportation, and food as well as climate change, and the interplay between national and local or regional government policies and their implementation. It will point to the role of social movements and popular protests to help us understand what has changed and why. And it will look at the structural barriers for change: the nature of China’s embrace of marketization, developmentalism, and urbanization on the one hand, and the continuing power of the fossil fuel industry and other environmentally problematic industry forces in the U.S. to shape or at least block policies.

About the Speaker

Robert Gottlieb is Emeritus Professor at Occidental College and founder and former executive director of the Urban & Environmental Policy Institute. He is the author or co-author of more than a dozen books; his most recent book, co-authored with Simon Ng, is Global Cities: Urban Environments in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, and China (MIT Press).

Sponsored by The New School’s interdisciplinary programs in Global StudiesUrban Studies, and Environmental Studies, and the India China Institute.

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Oct
26
Thu
2017
Religious Change and Disturbed Religious Ecosystems in Jiangsu, China w/ Robert Weller @ Orozco Room (#712)
Oct 26 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Religious Change and Disturbed Religious Ecosystems in Jiangsu, China

Talk by Professor Robert Weller

October 26, 2017 | 4:00-6:00 pm
Orozco Room (#712) | 66 W. 12th St, NY, The New School

 

About the Talk

Rapid urban expansion in wealthy parts of China has led to the resettlement of many villagers into high-rise buildings, making earlier forms of material and cultural life impossible.  At the same time, large-scale urban reconstruction has displaced many old city neighborhoods.  One result is that the territorially-based religion described in much of the anthropological and historical literature has become increasingly untenable as the entire ecosystem surrounding it has grown unstable. This talk examines what appears to be an especially creative zone for religious innovation:  the expanding urban edge.  The cases come from various cities in southern Jiangsu and focus on ghost attacks, a spirit medium network, and innovations in the forms and objects of temple worship. Theoretically, the paper thinks about ecosystems in the broadest sense of complexly articulated systems, without assuming a divide between nature and culture.

About the Speaker

Robert Weller is Professor of Anthropology & Director of Graduate Studies at Boston University. Weller’s work concentrates on China and Taiwan in comparative perspective. His actual research topics, however, are eclectic—running from ghosts to politics, rebellions to landscape paintings. Perhaps what unites everything is an interest in finding the limits to authority in all its settings. His publications include Unities and Diversities in Chinese Religion (1987),  Resistance, Chaos, and Control in China: Taiping Rebels, Taiwanese Ghosts and Tiananmen (1994), Alternate Civilities: Chinese Culture and the Prospects for Democracy (1999), Discovering Nature: Globalization and Environmental Culture in China and Taiwan (2006), and Ritual and Its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity (2008).

 

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