The India China Institute strives to offer a wide range of materials for anyone interested in learning more about what we call the re-emergence of the “India China Story.” Whether you’re an established scholar, a student, a policy analyst, or a curious citizen, our resources offer something for everyone.

Featured_IconTake a look at recent work from our network of scholars and Fellows below.
Featured Publications
PRESENTATION: ICI Fellow Milind Murugkar on Indian Food Security & the WTO
Description: Former ICI Fellow Milind Murugkar (2008-10) has recently put together an interesting presentation on the National Food Security Act in India and its connection to the World Trade Organization (WTO) for a talk in Delhi in July of 2014 titled “Coordinated Compliance: NFSA and WTO.” View presentation [Powerpoint PPT or Acrobat PDF].

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9780415603782BOOK: The Dao of World Politics: Towards a Post-Westphalian, Worldist International Relations (Routledge, 2014)

AUTHOR: L.H.M Ling

Description: L.H.M. Ling, a former ICI Fellow and a current member of ICI’s Faculty Advisory Committee theorizes that we may develop a richer, more representative approach towards sustainable and democratic governance by offering a non-Western alternative to hegemonic debates in IR. The book presents the story of world politics by integrating folk tales and popular culture with policy analysis. It does not exclude current models of liberal internationalism but rather brackets them for another day, another purpose. The deconstruction of IR as a singular unifying school of thought through the lens of a non-Westphalian analytic shows a unique perspective on the forces that drive and shape world politics. This book suggests new ways to articulate and act so that global politics is more inclusive and less coercive. Only then, the book claims, could IR realize what the dao has always stood for: a world of compassion and care.

Click here for more details on the book. In the Fall of 2013 ICI hosted a book launch and discussion. You can watch the event here.

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This is just a sample of available publications, articles and presentations that may be of interest. You can browse all of our past publications at the link below. If you are a scholar and want a publication featured here, send us an e-mail.

More Publications



 

Find out about upcoming events hosted by the India China Institute below.
Events Calendar

 

Mar
13
Mon
2017
Kailash Cartographies Art Exhibition @ Aronson Gallery - The New School
Mar 13 – Apr 2 all-day
Kailash Cartographies Art Exhibition @ Aronson Gallery - The New School

Kailash Cartographies is an exhibition of artists from India, China, Nepal, and the US exploring conceptions of sacred geography, particularly in the Himalayas.  Devotees encounter the sacred through ritual, art, and acts of pilgrimage and circumambulation of mountains and temples.  The artists in the exhibition pose questions about the nature of both the sacred and the secular by drawing on the points of connection with landscapes and lived worlds. The photographs, videos, works on paper and installations, deploy cartographic modes that are both personal and political.

The title of the exhibition refers to Mount Kailash, the symbolic center of the Buddhist and Bön cosmos and the seat of Shiva for Hindus. Although associated with a multiplicity of geographical sites and religious representations, its earthly manifestation is most often located in Tibet. “It is the simultaneously singular and plural aspect of this sacred geography that caught our imagination,” said Sreshta Rit Premnath, curator of the exhibition and participating artist. “Every gesture within such a geography is both specifically located yet can be powerfully invoked elsewhere.”

Featured artists are Atul Bhalla, Kevin Bubriski, Vibha Galhotra, Sreshta Rit Premnath, Ashmina Ranjit, Nitin Sawhney, Radhika Subramaniam, Charwei Tsai & Tsering Tashi Gyalthang, Zheng Bo & Jiang Chao and Qiu Zhijie.

Official press release about the exhibit. Watch a video with artists Sreshta Rit Premnath and Nitin Sawhney as they take viewers on a gallery walkthrough with The New School.

Presented by the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center and the India China Institute.

An opening reception will take place on March 15th with Bo Zheng and Steve Lam, and a closing reception and talk will take place on March 30th with New School faculty and ICI staff.

 


About the Exhibit

Kailash Cartographies presents artists from India, China, Nepal and the US exploring conceptions of sacred geography, particularly in the Himalayas. Devotees encounter the sacred through ritual, art, acts of pilgrimage and the circumambulation of mountains and temples. The artists in the exhibition pose questions about the nature of both the sacred and the secular by drawing on points of connection with landscapes and lived worlds. The photographs, videos, works on paper and installations, deploy cartographic modes that are both personal and political.
The title of the exhibition refers to Mount Kailash, the symbolic center of the Buddhist and Bön cosmos and the seat of Shiva for Hindus. Although associated with a multiplicity of geographical sites and religious representations, its earthly manifestation is most often located in Tibet. It is the simultaneously singular and plural aspect of this sacred geography that interests the artists in this exhibition. Every gesture within such a geography is both specifically located yet can be powerfully invoked elsewhere.

Kevin Bubriski’s video Karpo follows a white horse as it navigates the rocky terrain of the Limi Valley during a thirty-day pilgrimage to Mount Kailash. Viewing the landscape from this unusual vantage, the viewer is invited to consider pilgrimage from the viewpoint of a non-human being.

Sreshta Rit Premnath’s Sleeping Dogs, is a compilation of long shots of stray dogs sleeping in the streets of Kathmandu. These denizens appear passive in the midst of a bustling city, but as the saying goes, are best left undisturbed. Like loci in a map, these video fragments of sleeping dogs, animals whose presence is ubiquitous in Kathmandu, present a different logic of navigating the city.

Bo Zheng & Jiang Chao’s video Pteridophilia, explores the relation between humans and nature through the Buddhist concept of Karmamudra, the pursuit of enlightenment through sexual practice. In the video, naked men are seen licking, fondling and rubbing their bodies against lush green ferns in a dense rainforest. By picturing a carnal relationship with a forest, Zheng proposes an enlightened state in which the distinctions between humanity and nature collapse.

This idealist project extends to Qiu Zhijie’s Map of Utopia, which plots philosophers, philosophies, organizations and places (both real and imaginary) that are associated with utopian thought onto the same map. By flattening out disparate moments of history into a single temporality and consolidating distant geographic locations onto one island, Zhijie proposes a blueprint for a global utopian project that is yet to come.

Not as the Crow Flies Take 2, an eighteen foot long print and text piece akin to film strips, presents frames from Radhika Subramaniam’s walk along a section of the historic Indo-China trade route in the Kathmandu Valley. Subramaniam uses walking as an embodied research practice that affords a felt relation to the innumerable traders, pilgrims and travelers who have walked the same path over hundreds of years.

Nepali performance artist Ashmina Ranjit follows the same route, but backwards and in the opposite direction. Her twelve kilometer walk, from the oldest settlements of Kathmandu, and her childhood home, to the city’s thriving cultural center traces the Bagmati and Bishnumati rivers. Titled Same River – But the Water? her performance is framed through the chronic pollution that chokes both rivers.

Atul Bhalla’s photographic installation, titled Contemplating Drowning also considers the tragic pollution of the Bagmati river, but through the figure of Shiva, who is thought to create and destroy the universe in the blink of the eye. Bhalla juxtaposes the brass monkeys from the Golden Temple in Kathmandu with images of oil lamps, that appear like spirits which may be snuffed out by the river, photographed here at dusk. The title makes reference to a statue of Shiva that is found half sunken on the bank of the Bagmati and is seen as an omen of the end times.
This engagement with questions of the human impact on nature extends to the artist Vibha Galhotra’s photograph Who Owns the Earth, which documents a site-specific earth-work made during a residency in Mongolia. Written with cow dung on the Mongolian plateau, the titular text, legible only from a great distance, questions the status of fundamental resources like air, water and soil that have been divided and parceled by colonial and capitalist forces.

Charwei Tsai & Tsering Tashi Gyalthang touch on notions of homelessness and belonging in Songs of Chuchepati Camp. In this video, earthquake victims in a resettlement camp in Kathmandu sing songs expressing loss and longing. While some sing traditional Nepali folk songs, others improvise upon stories from their own lives. Eliding the politics that surrounds the issue of resettlement itself, the project gives visibility to the personal experiences of those seeking refuge and their desire to be free from suffering.

Suffering takes on a more ritualistic role in Kevin Bubriski’s large photograph Kailash Prostrations, shot during the same expedition to Kailash that is the subject of his video Karpo. This image documents pilgrims who circumambulate the mountain through repeated prostrations. By placing us as viewers directly in front of the pilgrims during their long and arduous journey, we are implicated into an empathic relation with the photographed subjects.

Nitin Sawhney’s Soundscapes of Kora, a four-channel sound installation in the center of the gallery that fills the space with audio recordings from two circumambulations performed by Sawhney, one around Mount Kailash and the other around the Boudhanath Stupa in Kathmandu. Ranging from the sound of monks chanting, to bells ringing, conversations between pilgrims and dogs barking, the artist invites the gallery visitor to enter into the soundscape and perform their own Kora.

 

The exhibition emerges from a three-year Luce Foundation supported research project by the India China Institute at The New School focused on Sacred Landscapes and Sustainable Futures in the Himalayas. In conjunction with this project, a group of artists initiated creative explorations from 2015-2016. Many of the works in this exhibition were the direct result of a creative workshop convened in Kathmandu in March 2016.

Mar
30
Thu
2017
Kailash Cartographies | Closing Reception & Faculty Talk @ Aronson Gallery & Kellen Auditorium
Mar 30 @ 5:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Kailash Cartographies | Closing Reception & Faculty Talk @ Aronson Gallery & Kellen Auditorium

Sacred Landscapes Talk

Come listen as New School faculty members and ICI staff share their insights from fieldwork in India, Nepal and Tibet as part of a three-year Sacred Himalaya Initiative focused on religion, ecology and culture in the Himalayas. Faculty involved with ICI’s research project–Rafi Youatt (NSSR), Mark Larrimore (Lang), Nitin Sawhney (Media Studies) and Sreshta Rit Premnath (Parsons)–will talk about their experiences traveling in these sacred landscapes and how this work has influenced their own artistic and academic practices as well as their teaching. A photo presentation highlighting some of the key areas from the field research will be featured.

5:00-6:00 pm – Gallery Tour and Reception
6:00-7:00 pm – Faculty Talk and Presentation

The opening reception and gallery tour will take place in the Aronson Gallery, 66 Fifth Ave. The talk will take place next door in the Kellen Auditorium.

Drinks and refreshments will be served. The event is free and will be Live streamed on the official New School channel. Watch it there.

This event is the final event for the Kailash Cartographies exhibition. Learn more about the month-long exhibit here.

A press release about the exhibit can be found here.


About the Exhibit

Kailash Cartographies is an exhibition of artists from India, China, Nepal, and the US exploring conceptions of sacred geography, particularly in the Himalayas.  Devotees encounter the sacred through ritual, art, and acts of pilgrimage and circumambulation of mountains and temples.  The artists in the exhibition pose questions about the nature of both the sacred and the secular by drawing on the points of connection with landscapes and lived worlds. The photographs, videos, works on paper and installations, deploy cartographic modes that are both personal and political.

The title of the exhibition refers to Mount Kailash, the symbolic center of the Buddhist and Bön cosmos and the seat of Shiva for Hindus. Although associated with a multiplicity of geographical sites and religious representations, its earthly manifestation is most often located in Tibet. “It is the simultaneously singular and plural aspect of this sacred geography that caught our imagination,” said Sreshta Rit Premnath, curator of the exhibition and participating artist. “Every gesture within such a geography is both specifically located yet can be powerfully invoked elsewhere.”

The exhibition emerges from a three-year research project of The New School’s India China Institute focused on Sacred Landscapes and Sustainable Futures in the Himalayas.  In conjunction with this endeavor, a group of artists initiated creative explorations during 2015-2016.  Many of the works in this exhibition were the direct result of a creative workshop convened in Kathmandu in March 2016. The exhibit is part of ICI’s ongoing Sacred Himalaya Initiative research project focused on Mount Kailash in Tibet.

Featured artists are Atul Bhalla, Kevin Bubriski, Vibha Galhotra, Sreshta Rit Premnath, Ashmina Ranjit, Nitin Sawhney, Radhika Subramaniam, Charwei Tsai & Tsering Tashi Gyalthang, Zheng Bo & Jiang Chao and Qiu Zhijie.

Presented by the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center and the India China Institute.

Mar
31
Fri
2017
The Myth and Dilemma of Public (gōng gòng) Design @ Kellen Auditorium (N101)
Mar 31 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
The Myth and Dilemma of Public (gōng gòng) Design @ Kellen Auditorium (N101)

PUBLIC LIVING ENVIRONMENTS:
The Myth and Dilemma of Public (公共 gōng gòng) Design

A Lecture by Kin Wai Michael SIU

6:30-8:30 pm | Kellen Auditorium (#101), 66 Fifth Ave., The New School

Kin Wai Michael SIU will discuss the term “public” from the perspective of its more complex Chinese language equivalent—公共 (gōng gòng), examining how the interpretation of these constituent terms influences the design of public spaces. He will suggest that, for design researchers and practitioners, a re-thinking of the relationship between gōng and gòng can result in better public living environments.

RSVP for Event

About the Speaker

Kin Wai Michael SIU is Chair Professor of Public Design and Leader of the Public Design Lab at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. His research areas include public design, user reception, inclusive design, and social innovation. In addition to publishing widely, he holds over 50 US and international patents and design registrations, and has received numerous invention and design awards.

Presented by School of Design Strategies, Parsons. The Stephan Weiss Lecture Series is made possible by an endowment established by The Karan-Weiss Foundation, Donna Karan, Gabrielle Karan, Corey Weiss, and Lisa Weiss. The spring 2017 Stephan Weiss Lecture is co-sponsored by India China Institute.

Apr
10
Mon
2017
Conceptualising ‘Contemporaneous Migration’ through China’s Global Connections – ZIMM Lecture w/ Lynn-Ee Ho @ Wolff Conference Room (1103)
Apr 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Conceptualising ‘Contemporaneous Migration’ through China’s Global Connections - ZIMM Lecture w/ Lynn-Ee Ho @ Wolff Conference Room (1103)

Conceptualising ‘Contemporaneous Migration’
through China’s Global Connections

A Public Talk with Elaine Lynn-Ee Ho

April 10th, 6pm | Wolff Conference Room, (1103)
6 East, 16th Street, The New School

The Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility and the India China Institute at The New School are excited to announce a lecture by Elaine Lynn-Ee Ho on contemporary migration in China.

About the Talk

What might reimagining citizenship and state spaces look like if we examine emigration, immigration and re-migration under the same analytical lens? This presentation develops the concept of ‘contemporaneous migration’ as an analytical framework to draw together the different manifestations of migration directionality that converge in a polity and their interconnections across global space. Through interviews findings and ethnographic data, this presentation interfaces Chinese emigration with China’s current transition into an immigrant society. Seemingly distinct trends of emigration, immigration and re-migration have been normally subsumed under national narratives portraying China as the ancestral homeland of the overseas and returning Chinese, or by depicting foreign immigration as a potential threat to public security and the purity of the Chinese nation. This presentation argues that the presence of ‘foreign’ Chinese diasporic descendants in China can be usefully juxtaposed against the experiences of non-Chinese foreigners to draw out the nuances of how fraternity and alterity manifest in Chinese society today. In so doing, the presentation argues that the different manifestations of migration directionality can and should be analysed alongside one another so as to draw out the spatial connections and temporal considerations that are otherwise elided in studies that compartmentalise such types of migration.

About the Speaker

Elaine Lynn-Ee Ho is Associate Professor of Geography at National University of Singapore. Her work focuses on transnational migration and citizenship, ‘diaspora’ strategies and extraterritorial citizenship, Asian forced migration, emotional geographies, and the politics of cosmopolitanism. She has been recently conducting research on China-Myanmar borderland migrations, Chinese diaspora and transnationalism, Asian forced migration, and urban aspirations of new immigrants in China. Her recent publications include ‘The geo-social and global geographies of power: Urban aspirations of ‘worlding’ African students in China’ in Geopolitics, and ‘Mobilising affinity ties: Kachin internal displacement and the geographies of humanitarianism at the China-Myanmar border’ in Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers.

Apr
20
Thu
2017
Mountains and Sacred Landscapes Conference @ The New School
Apr 20 – Apr 23 all-day
Mountains and Sacred Landscapes Conference @ The New School

The India China Institute (ICI) at The New School, the International Society for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture (ISSRNC), American University’s Center for Latin American and Latino Studies (CLALS), and the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) are excited to announce an international conference on Mountains and Sacred Landscapes at The New School in New York City from Thursday April 20th to Sunday April 23rd, 2017. The conference will include the latest research on the intersections or religion, nature and culture and will also feature special presentation from the India China Institute’s three-year research project on Sacred Landscapes and Sustainable Futures in the Himalaya (Sacred Himalaya Initiative).

View the conference page

Diverse mountain communities from the Himalaya to the Andes to the Appalachians face growing pressures linked to social and ecological changes. Melting glaciers, shifting agricultural patterns, conflicts over mining and resource extraction, and risks to livelihoods, the consequences of increasingly erratic global climate change, pose unknown future challenges to many sacred landscapes, including mountain communities and ecosystems and those beings, human and nonhuman alike, who rely on these habitats. Scholars have even suggested we have entered a fundamentally new geologic epoch called the Anthropocene.

The conference seeks to critically explore how the idea of sacred landscapes is entangled with these communities, with a particular interest in topics related to mountain landscapes. Some of the issues we hope to explore include: major challenges and opportunities facing communities in the 21st century; religious conceptualizations of place and landscape; relationships between mountain spiritualities and peoples adapting to climate change; traditional ecological knowledge held by communities that can help address issues of social and ecological justice; the future of mountain and forest peoples; and the fate of more than human worlds inhabiting these diverse landscapes. What kinds of meanings shape and are shaped by the effects of climate change, mass extinction, human population growth and ecological degradation of mountains, forests, rivers and other sacred landscapes? How do ritual activities linked to sacred landscapes respond to environmental challenges, or not? How do mountains—as highly biodiverse ecosystems, as critical sources of water, energy, and materials, as repositories of tradition, and as sacred beings—remain vital components in ongoing processes of religious change? How do understandings of the sacred manifest within and across different landscapes, such as deserts, rivers or forests?

More details and registration are available on the conference website.

 


 

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Maps Resources

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India China Related Courses
The New School offers various classes on India and China related economic, political, architectural, cultural and environmental issues. To see a list of past and current courses click here. More

 

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India China Related Links


 

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India China News

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ICI strives to connect India, China and the US together in a holistic manner, from local to global. If you are looking for something and can’t find it, let us know and we will try to help. If you’re a scholar or policy expert and have an article or paper you would like us to feature, send us a an e-mail. In addition to these online resources, ICI has a small in-house library related to India and China. If you’re in the NY area and want to view our library, give us a call or send us an e-mail to setup an appointment.