Mar
1
Thu
2018
Deadline to Apply – Faculty Research & Curriculum Development Grants @ The New School
Mar 1 all-day
Deadline to Apply - Faculty Research & Curriculum Development Grants @ The New School

The Faculty Research and Curriculum Development Grants will support new or continuing research, curriculum development and student engagement on India and China by faculty in any division of The New School. Six Faculty Research Awards (up to $10,000 each) and one of up to $15,000 for the express purpose of curriculum development and student engagement will be distributed, and grant recipients will have 24 months to carry out the proposed activities of the grant. Grant recipients are requested to give a presentation upon completion of the initiative, the form of which may be mutually determined at the time of funding.

Applications must be submitted by March 1, 2018. Awards will be announced in early April 2018. Complete details about the grants can be found here.

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Rural-Urban Transformations: Remaking the Rural in Shenzhen, China @ BARK ROOM (ORIENTATION ROOM)
Mar 1 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Rural-Urban Transformations: Remaking the Rural in Shenzhen, China @ BARK ROOM (ORIENTATION ROOM)

RURAL-URBAN TRANSFORMATIONS: REMAKING THE RURAL IN SHENZHEN, CHINA

THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 2018| 6:00-8:00 pm
BARK ROOM (ORIENTATION ROOM) 2 WEST 13TH STREET, ROOM M-104 NEW YORK, NY 10011

A Public Talk with MARY ANN O’DONNELL
With opening remarks by JONATHAN BACH

 

About the Talk

As Chinese cities expand at a staggering rate, the idea of the “rural” is transformed both in terms of spaces and bodies. In this context, how is rapid urbanization changing the meaning of “the Local (本地)” as an important element of traditional Chinese cultural geography? This talk examines the official designation of Shenzhen as China’s first city without villages. It asks how this is transforming “local” identity and what the history of “the local” in Shenzhen tells us about contemporary China and its role in globalization.

About the Speaker

Artist-Ethnographer Mary Ann O’Donnell has sought alternative ways of inhabiting Shenzhen, the flagship of China’s post Mao economic reforms. O’Donnell creates and contributes to projects that reconfigure and repurpose shared spaces, where our worlds mingle and collide, sometimes collapse, and often implode. Ongoing projects include her blog, “Shenzhen Noted” and the Handshake 302 Art Space in Baishizhou. In January 2017, the University of Chicago Press published Learning from Shenzhen: China’s Post Mao Experiment from Special Zone to Model City, which she co-edited with Winnie Wong and Jonathan Bach. Her research has been published in positions: east Asian cultures critique, TDR: The Drama Review, and the Hong Kong Journal of Cultural Studies. O’Donnell is currently co director of the Handshake 302 Art Space in Baishizhou and director of public programs at the P+V Gallery in Dalang.

This event is organized by The New School’s Global, Urban, and Environmental Studies (GLUE)and co-sponsored by the India China Institute.

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Mar
5
Mon
2018
Agrarian Elites in Urban Real Estate: Urban and Land Transformations along New Economic Corridors in Liberalizing India @ Orozco Room, Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall
Mar 5 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Agrarian Elites in Urban Real Estate: Urban and Land Transformations along New Economic Corridors in Liberalizing India @ Orozco Room, Alvin Johnson/J.M. Kaplan Hall

Professor Sai Balakrishnan will be exploring the narrative movements of urbanization in contemporary India from megacities to the contested geographies along new economic corridors. As policymakers search for new market-oriented means for the transfer of land from agrarian constituencies to infrastructural promoters and urban developers, the re-allocation of property control is erupting into volatile land-based social conflicts. Professor Balakrishnan puts forward the argument that some of India’s most decisive conflicts over its urban futures will unfold in these corridor regions where electorally strong agrarian propertied classes are coming into direct encounters with financially powerful incoming urban firms. She calls for new theories of land and urbanization that are capable of incorporating within them the agrarian political economy. Through focusing on the agrarian to urban land-use change along India’s first economic corridor, the Mumbai-Pune Expressway, she articulates how diverse agrarian property regimes shape the trajectories of contemporary urbanization in liberalizing India.

An India China Institute public event. RSVP here to register for the event.

 

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